Brief Introduction to Ribbon Fiber Optic Cable

In order to meet the increasing system bandwidth needs, local area network (LAN) campus and building backbones, as well as data center backbones, are migrating to higher cabled fiber counts. Ribbon fiber optic cables can offer the highest fiber density relative to cable size, maximize utilization of pathway and spaces and facilitate ease of termination, which makes them an ideal solution for the need. This post mainly focuses on the benefits and applications of ribbon fiber optic cable.

Ribbon Fiber Optic Cable Design

Ribbon fiber optic cable is a type of cable widely deployed in campus, building and data center backbone applications where high fiber counts are required. There are 8 fibers, 12 fibers, 24 fibers and other higher fiber counts available on the market. At present the 12-fiber ribbons are readily accessible and identifiable with ribbon identification numbers and TIA-598 compliant fiber color coding, which make it prevalent in today’s networks. Usually there are two kinds of outer jacket of ribbon fiber optic cables: non-flame-retardant and formulated flame-retardant. The former is often used in outside plant applications, while the latter is typically used for indoor applications. Here is an example of ribbon fiber optic cable construction.

ribbon fiber optic cable

Benefits of Ribbon Fiber Optic Cable

As we all know, stranded loose-tube and ribbon fiber optic cables are staples of the outside plant applications. Both of them perform well in harsh outdoor environments, and both are available in a multitude of configurations, including: all-dielectric, armored, aerial self-supporting, etc. However, when compared to stranded loose-tube cable designs, the ribbon fiber design offers robust performance equivalent to the stranded loose-tube cable, and provides the maximum fiber density relative to cable diameter. The chief distinction between these cables is the manner in which the individual fibers themselves are packaged and managed within the cable. A ribbon fiber cable has the individual fibers precisely bonded together in a matrix that might encompass as few as four or as many as 24 fibers. In contrast, a loose-tube cable has between 2 to 24 individual fibers housed in multiple buffer tubes with each fiber detached from the other.

ribbon fiber optic cable vs loose tube cable

It’s the special ribbon fiber design that makes ribbon fiber optic cable offer more advantages over loose-tube designs in many applications.

  • Ribbon fiber optic cable can be prepped and spliced much more rapidly than loose tube cables. That’s means less installation time, less installation labor cost and significantly less emergency restoration time.
  • Ribbon fiber optic cables enable a smaller footprint in splice closures and telecommunications room fiber management.
  • Ribbon cables offer greater packing density in higher fiber counts which enables more efficient use of limited duct space.
  • Ribbon cables are typically very cost competitive in counts above 96 fibers.
Ribbon Fiber Optic Cable Application

Although there are various fiber counts available with ribbon fiber optic cable, the 12-fiber ribbon cables are the most commonly used ones. With the introduction of innovations such as ribbon splitting tools and field-installable 12-fiber array connectors, 12-fiber ribbons are easily terminated with simplex and duplex connectors such as LC or SC connectors or with the MTP connector. The MTP connector is a 12-fiber push/pull optical connector with a footprint similar to the common simplex connector. Many users like to apply MTP connectors to ensure the highest quality connector insertion loss and return loss performance and to expedite the cable installation.

In order to illustrate how ribbon fiber optic cables are deployed, here take the termination of MTP connectorized ribbon cable with patch panel as an example.

The termination is normally used in an interconnect application where a harness assembly is used on the front of the patch panel. We know the MTP fiber cable has 12-fiber MTP connector on one end of the cable and simplex or duplex style connectors on the other end. Just like the picture below shows.

mtp-harness-assemblies

Except for the application noted above, ribbon fiber optic cables also can be used in both interconnect and cross-connect applications where an MTP connector module cassette is used. And they can be applied to pathways and spaces.

Conclusion

Ribbon fiber optic cables deliver high fiber density in the most compact cable package possible. And they also maximize the number of fibers that can be deployed in a limited space while streamlining fiber termination. At the same time they can save time and money with easy mass fusion splicing. Ribbon fiber cable is now easily obtained using traditional simplex or duplex connectors as well as MTP Connectors, which make them suitable for various applications.

Several Common Bulk Fiber Cables

With the creation of modern technology, many new networks will choose to use bulk fiber cable instead of traditional copper based cables to increase the capability and speed of the network.Many different types of fiber optic cables in our life. They are generally used in different places. Under different conditions to select the appropriate cable.From Fiberstore, they inculding the Indoor Cables, Outdoor Cables, FTTH Cables, Armored Cables, LSZH Cables and some special cables. They are various at Aerial Cables, Building Cables, Direct buried cables, Duct Cables, Underwater/Submarine Cable. Some of our optical fiber comes with steel tube and steel wire armoring, suitable for sea, lake and river applications. Customers have the flexibility to choose a cable plant to best fit their needs. Only optical fiber that meets or exceeds industry standards is used to ensure quality products with best-in-class performance.So many cable in it, but do you know which cable you need.Tell you some info about LSZH cables,Ribbon fiber cable,Indoor Outdoor Cable.I think it can help you choose the nice cable.

What is Low Smoke Zero Halogen (LSZH) ?
Low Smoke Zero Halogen (LSZH) is a type if cable jacketing made of polypropylene that gives off limited smoke and no halogens when come across fire or strong heat. LSZH cable jacketing consists of thermoplastic or thermoset compounds that produce limited smoke and no halogen when come across high sources of heat, e. grams. flare.Low Smoke Zero Halogen cable can be called LSF (low smoke and fume), LSHF (low smoke halogen free), and LS0H (low smoke zero halogen).

Why to used the LSZH Cables ?
Low smoke zero halogen cable reduces the amount of toxic and corrosive gas emitted during combustion. This type of material is typically used in badly ventilated areas such as planes or railroad cars. Low smoke zero halogen is becoming very popular and, in some cases, a requirement where the protection of men and women and equipment from toxic and corrosive gas is very important.

They don’t produce a dangerous gas/acid combination in case of fire. LSZH patch cords are for utilization in patching environments with poor air circulation where personnel and equipment may be exposed to corrosive fumes and toxins during combustion. The cable jacket for these wires is designed to minimize the release of halogen fumes and toxicants into the air, reducing the potential of hazardous contact in occupied spaces. LSZH cables are mainly used in The european countries.

What is Ribbon Fiber Cable ?
Ribbon fiber optic cable is preferred where high fiber counts and small diameter cables are needed. This cable has the highest packing density, since all the fibers are laid out in rows in ribbons, typically of 12 fibers, and the ribbons are laid on top of each other. Not only is this the smallest cable for the most number of fibers, it’s usually the lowest cost. Typically 144 fibers in ribbons only has a cross section of about 1/4 inch or 6 mm and the jacket is only 13 mm or 1/2 inch diameter! Some cable designs use a “slotted core” with up to 6 of these 144 fiber ribbon assemblies for 864 fibers in one cable! Since it’s outside plant cable, it’s gel-filled for water blocking or dry water-blocked. These cables are common in LAN backbones and data centers.

Where can used the Ribbon Cables?
Ribbon cables are usually seen for internal peripherals in computers, such as hard drives, CD drives and floppy drives. On some older computer systems (such as the BBC Micro and Apple II series) they were used for external connections as well. Unfortunately the ribbon-like shape interferes with computer cooling by disrupting airflow within the case and also makes the cables awkward to handle, especially when there are a lot of them; round cables have almost entirely replaced ribbon cables for external connections and are increasingly being used internally as well.

What is Indoor Outdoor Fiber Optic Cable?
Indoor Outdoor Fiber Optic Cable
is designed to meet both the stringent environmental requirements typical of outside plant cable AND the flammability requirements of premise applications. Ideal for applications that span indoor and outdoor environments. By eliminating the need for outside to inside cross-connection, the entire system reliability is improved and with lower overall installation costs.

Ideal for applications that span indoor and outdoor environments, Indoor/outdoor cable can eliminate the need for building entryway splice points, saving both time and money. Outdoor/Indoor cables combine the flame resistance and safety features of an indoor riser or plenum cable with the durability that is critical for OSP use. The result is a unique, dual-purpose cable that can save time and money by allowing OSP applications to flow seamlessly indoors, using a single cable and no splices.

Note:Customers have the flexibility to choose a cable plant to best fit their needs.
If you want to know more info about fiber optic cables,pls visit fiberstore.com or contact us via Sales@fiberstore.com.